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The bad news for former Hillary Clinton campaign lawyer Michael Sussmann keeps coming.

First, a federal judge last week denied Sussmann’s motion to dismiss special counsel John Durham’s case against him, as Fox News reported, leaving Sussmann still facing trial next month on a charge of making a false statement to a federal agent.

Then on Friday, Durham filed a motion with the court that could make Sussmann look much worse than that.

Sussmann’s trial is scheduled to begin on May 16.

In Friday’s motion, Durham revealed two new pieces of information.

First, it included two sets of CIA notes pertaining to Sussmann’s initial contact with the agency on Jan. 31, 2017, and his subsequent meeting the following month. (In September 2016, Sussmann had met with then-FBI General Counsel James Baker.)

The notes were deeply critical of Sussmann’s data, which purported to show, as Fox News reported, a secret communication connection between The Trump Organization and Russia’s Alfa Bank, which has ties to the Russian government.

The motion identifies Alfa Bank as “Russia Bank-1.” The connection was supposedly maintained during the Trump presidential campaign through phones from the Russian cellphone manufacturer Yota, identified in the motion as “Russian Phone Provider-1.”

Durham’s filing states: “Agency-2 [the CIA] concluded in early 2017 that the Russian Bank-1 data and Russian Phone Provider-1 data was not ‘technically plausible,’ did not ‘withstand technical scrutiny,’ ‘contained gaps,’ ‘conflicted with [itself],’ and was ‘user created and not machine/tool generated.’ The Special Counsel’s Office has not reached a definitive conclusion in this regard.”

The charge against Sussmann now relates only to what he told Baker when he asked for the September meeting. If the data he was discussing were not only misleading but deliberately manufactured, it only hardens suspicions of how hard Sussmann and others were working to plant the seeds of suspicion that…

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