Georgia Man Convicted of Voter Fraud, Slapped with Brutal Punishment for His Crime

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A Walker County, Georgia, man was handed a very hefty sentence for submitting another resident’s absentee ballot that had erroneously wound up in his post office box.

Following his conviction for voter fraud, William Chase, 62, was sentenced to 25 years in prison for forging a ballot in Georgia’s January 2021 runoff election, according to WTVC.

District Attorney Chris Arnt told WTVC that a couple who had requested absentee ballots grew concerned when they received just one ballot and contacted the Walker County Elections Office. Records showed the missing ballot had “already been accepted, but not yet counted.”

After viewing the signature at the Elections Office, the woman knew it had been forged.

Arnt said an investigation conducted by the Secretary of State Office determined the woman’s ballot had been sent to Chase by mistake and that he had already sent in his own ballot. Chase was arrested after his fingerprints matched those on the forged ballot.

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According to the DA, Chase was convicted of “forgery in the first degree, illegal acts regarding election documents, unlawful acts regarding elector’s vote, and repeat voting in same election.”

Chase’s criminal history includes convictions for “bankruptcy fraud, theft by shoplifting, forgery in the first degree, stealing public documents, and financial identity fraud.”

“Chase is sentenced to 25 years, with the first 15 years to be served in the Georgia Department of Corrections without the possibility of parole,” the report said.

While that may seem to be an overly harsh punishment for the act of forging an absentee ballot, voting is one of the most sacred rights of an American citizen. Chase knowingly tried to disenfranchise this woman by forging her signature.

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Chase’s conviction is unusual in that typically, voter fraud is difficult to prove. But, particularly in states who send ballots out to every resident included on their voter rolls, it’s clear how easy it would be to collect and submit those ballots. And, in a close election, the fraudulent votes could be sufficient to sway the result.

In the months…


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